Autumn Vegetables

Keep it Bright: Blanching Vegetables

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The weather's gorgeous and no one wants to be indoors cooking for hours. Hence, blanching is the perfect vegetable technique for Spring. Many vegetables can be blanched in a pot full of boiling water until crisp and slightly under-done. Drain the vegetables and immediately plunge into a bath of ice water to stop the cooking and retain the bright color. You can cook several night’s worth of vegetables this way and store them in the fridge in containers lined with paper towel to capture the moisture. 

To use, sauté vegetables in good oil or butter just until warmed through or toss them into a salad. Mix vegetables that are grown in the same season; they naturally taste delicious together. 

Here’s a list of vegetables to use for blanching and fun combinations for sautéing. The italicised vegetables should not be blanched.

Asparagus, snow peas or sugar snap peas with:

  • Green onion, shaved fennel and slivered ham or prosciutto
  • Salted cashews
  • Sugar snap peas and frozen petite peas, lemon zest
  • Sesame seeds sautéd in sesame oil

Carrots with:

  • Green onion, lime juice, and chopped cashews
  • Ghee or coconut oil with cardamom, cinnamon, black pepper
  • Cauliflower, mint & preserved lemon

Broccolini with:

  • Garlic, olive oil and chili flakes
  • Capers, toasted hazelnuts or pine nuts 

Green beans with:

  • Bacon and toasted walnuts or pecans
  • Diced tomatoes, garlic and nicoise or black olives

Carrots with:

  • Caraway seeds
  • Chick peas, Moroccan spices

Broccoli, cauliflower with:

  • Garlic, crumbled (leftover) Italian sausage
  • Raisins soaked in hot water then sautéed, blue cheese crumbles, pine-nuts
  • Cauliflower with curry and raisins
  • Sautéd mushrooms, shallots, basil, Pecorino 
  • Brown butter, pumpkin seeds, cumin

Blanched Spring Vegetables with Arugula, Olive Oil, Lemon & Cheese

Here's a quick, delicious, and very detoxifying salad that I love to make-

In a bowl, add a large handful of arugula per person along with a handful of blanched vegetables per person.  Note that in the photo, I've used asparagus, snap peas and fava beans. Toss with just enough good quality olive oil to coat the leaves with no oil puddling at the bottom of the bowl. Squeeze fresh lemon juice to taste and toss with a spoonful of capers. Cover with a blanket of freshly grated Parmesan. Enjoy!

 

Carrots with Sumac & Pomegranate Molasses

Carrots pair perfectly with the tang of sumac and the sweetness of pomegranate syrup. Use rainbow carrots for a psychedelic blast of color.

Serves 2-4

  • 2 bunches carrots, peeled and left whole or cut into thick pieces
  •  2 to 3 tsp. good olive oil
  • 1 tsp. sumac* or to taste
  • 2 tsp. pomegranate molasses
  • sea salt to taste
  • chopped fresh cilantro (optional)
  • Preheat oven to 450˚F

If you are using the oven anyway: 

Line a cooke sheet with parchment paper. Add the carrot and toss with 1 teaspoon olive oil to coat/ Roast until tender, about 30 to 45 minutes depending on the thickness of the carrots.

In a small bowl, blend the molasses, sumac and one teaspoon olive oil. When the carrots are done, drizzle them with half of the syrup mixture and a dash of salt and toss using the parchment as a cradle, rolling the carrots back and forth. Place the carrots on a serving platter and drizzle with the remaining syrup mixture.

If you aren’t using your oven and need a faster option:

Boil the carrots in a pot of salted water until they are crisp tender and not all the way done, about 4 to 8 minutes. Drain and place on the parchment-lined cookie sheet. Pat dry with paper towel and toss with 1 teaspoon olive oil to coat/ Roast until tender, about 5-10 minutes depending on the thickness of the carrots.

In a small bowl, blend the molasses, sumac and one teaspoon olive oil. When the carrots are done, drizzle them with half of the syrup mixture and a dash of salt and toss using the parchment as a cradle, rolling the carrots back and forth. Place the carrots on a serving platter and drizzle with the remaining syrup mixture.

*Sumac is a powdered berry native to the Middle East and found in Mediterranean markets.